Monday, March 14, 2016

Workshop Snaps

New York, New York

A few snaps from the Digital Platinum Workshop this weekend at CAP/Penumbra. Since the digital printer we were using was an Epson P600 with a different inkset than the 3880s I've used before, the class got to really do a calibration of the negative-making system instead of simply seeing a demonstration of it. Things came under control nicely (the newer printer has more ability to block UV light, as shown by the calibration tests, and that's an advantage). Each participant ended up with a handful of nicely-done prints. We had originals from 4x5 color transparency scans, 8x10 b&w neg scans, digital captures with Leica Monochrom, Nikon D800E, and Canon dslr cameras so there was a lot to see and learn in working up the originals as inkjet output for printing in palladium.

Part of the fun was that Carol Boss at Hahnemuhle had shipped in a bunch of sample packs of their new Platinum Rag paper and everyone got to try it on Sunday.  Lovely stuff, a very welcome addition to the limited number of available papers well-suited to the process. I was so busy running between the digital darkroom and the Pt/Pd lab that I only got a chance to make some snapshots at the very end of the workshop, so not all of the participants are seen here.





4 comments:

John said...

Does not look like a shortage of students! Good to see!

Glen Roberson said...

Are there any online resources for this type of printing? I'm wanting to create platinum panorama prints of my photography, but I don't really know anything about the process yet.

Carl Weese said...

Glen, there are resources if you do a search, but they will be of varying quality and accuracy. I haven't looked at them enough to make a recommendation of one over another. The first step though is to look at actual platinum/palladium prints, not online presentations, to decide if the medium is really right for you.

Glen Roberson said...

Thank you for the advice. You're right of course. I haven't held a Platinum print in my hands. My only problem is that no one I know is printing using this process. I'll ask Crystal Bridges Museum if they have any in their collection that I can view. Everything that I've dead and viewed makes me believe that this is how I want to print my photography.
Again, thank you.
Glen