Wednesday, June 27, 2012

The Comanche

Buena Vista, Colorado

About forty-five minutes ago, 7:00 local time, the conditions were just what I wanted. This sort of resembles the framing of the 7x17" b&w shots. The owner told me that while it's been closed for a while he hopes to have The Comanche open again in a few weeks. The town, elevation just under 8,000 feet, is a tourist center, which is one of the few things you can count on to keep a drive-in theater in operation.

6 comments:

lyle said...

now i understand why you wanted the mountains....great photograph...

Carl said...

Lyle, in terms of regional landscape settings, the mountain surround was the last missing element. I've been trying to get it for several days now—in Idaho, Utah, and Colorado. I felt like the bear had just climbed off my back when I'd finished making three 7x17 variations out at the theater this morning. When I got back to the room and checked out the captures I wanted to post one as a celebration.

Now, I'll check out a couple of theaters in northern Missouri and Illinois that I've missed in the past, but otherwise I'm just heading back through territory already covered, or without surviving theaters. Feels almost like a vacation. Except that in Lexington, NE, tonight, it's still 100° at nearly eight o'clock. Luckily I have cold salads from the cooler for dinner.

Don and Sher said...

Really like the light.

Roger Overall said...

Wow! Carl, what a location for a movie theatre. It must be some experience to see a film in the twilight under a mountain.

Roger

James.M said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
James.M said...

Great location and light, Carl. I was just looking through Adams' The New West and came across his picture of a drive-in at Cheyenne Mountain (the first picture in the last section, "Foothills"), which quickly sent me scurrying back to your blog to find this shot again.

Do you know it? My google skills tell me it's not the same place (Cheyenne Mountain is Colorado Springs, apparently). Which I probably could have worked out anyway--the peaks have a different profile. But there are some similarities in the framing, and in the placement of the screen in relation to the mountains. Great photographers occasionally see alike, etc!